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How A Help Almost Sold Her Boss’ Children Into Slavery

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How Well Do You Know Your Artisan? A very good question right? I know you would probably be wondering why I’m asking such a question. Well, the fact remains that a lot of us claim we know or even have a relationship with the artisans who work for us. That plumber, that electrician, that house-help, that hair dresser and so on.

Do these guys really offer the value they claim when met initially? Are they really who they claim to be?

Let me tell you a little story and why it’s a BIG ISSUE to know your Artisan to an extensive level.

I have a friend who employed a house-help about 3 months ago to help with looking after her 2 baby boys. And also to help with cleaning the house. The house-help was recommended by an “Agency” (There are so many of them around currently). No background check was done on the girl, no profiling or the like. All she had was a single Guarantor who was able to stand for her (so we thought). At the time, my friend was desperately in need of a help, as a result of her new Job. So she felt the Guarantor was enough and did not bother to follow up (Big mistake).

A month after the girl (House-help) was employed; the Lady (my good friend) noticed that she was always requesting to go on off duty at least twice a week. The help would call her at work and tell her she needed to visit her people for one funny reason or the other. Unknown to her, this Help was actually making plans to kidnap her bosses 2 sons and sell to some Criminal syndicates. All for a mere N100,000 compensation, N50k for each Child.

As God would have it, the day she planned to execute her diabolical plans, happened to be the same day my friend’s neighbour (They all stay in the same compound) took leave to stay off work. The neighbour saw her leaving the house with the boys on the pretext that she was going to buy some food items for the Children. The neighbour, a bit uncomfortable, knowing that the Help had never taken the kids out to buy anything in the past; decided to follow her discreetly without her notice, at least to confirm she was actually going to buy something.

Cut the long story, the HELP was caught while doing the transaction and the Children were saved. The Parents alerted and the Police involved.

This may seem to be a story with a good ending, but truth be told, there are cases where the end wasn’t as palatable. With the parties involved left with regrets and sorrow.

So back to my question, “How Well Do You Know Your Artisan?”

 

On Jambolo.com, you can be sure of proper verification, as well as proper historical background check and profiling for all Artisans engaged on the platform. Jambolo.com equally goes as far as ensuring Artisans are reviewed appropriately before their services are engaged.

So the next time, you want to engage an Artisan, think security.

Engage your next Artisan on Jambolo.com and enjoy peace of mind. You can reach Jambolo.com Contact Centre for inquiries today via 09090022116 and 09090033116

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Instagram to Launch TikTok Competitor in August

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One of the rising stars of the COVID era has been TikTok, the Chinese-owned video-sharing app that’s enchanted teens and young adults, while causing privacy concerns for our nation’s leaders.

But American-owned Instagram announced this week that it will launch a competitor by early August. The new feature, called Reels, is almost identical to TikTok.

What will Reels offer?

Reels will be a feature embedded in the Instagram app. Users will be able to access it by clicking a new icon at the bottom of the screen. They will then be able to create a 15-second video with their choice of music from a large library of songs. Instagram already compiled this wide songbook of licensed music before the launch of the popular Stories feature. But in terms of user interface, Reels will look nearly identical to TikTok.

The major difference from the Chinese prototype is that posts on Reels will disappear when the story expires. TikTok, on the other hand, allows users to revisit videos permanently. If creators want to save their videos on Reels, they’ll have to add them to their profile.

Rolling Out the Feature

Reels will be available in the U.S. and 50 other countries by early August. It first launched last year in Brazil, and has also had trial runs in Germany and France. Additionally, Reels is available in India, which was TikTok’s second-largest market until its government banned the app last month over cybersecurity concerns.

If you are a casual Instagram user and are not looking forward to the inevitable avalanche of Reels stories, fear not. You can mute these stories by clicking a circular icon at the top of the home screen and holding down until a pop-up appears. Select “mute,” then “mute story.”

There are also rumors of a potential Reels app that is separate from the main Instagram app. This would be an attempt to recreate the TikTok experience.

Imitation is the Sincerest Form of Flattery

Reels will not be the first time that Instagram, which is a subsidiary of Facebook, has stolen popular features from other apps. Stories were originally a function of Snapchat, before Instagram recreated the feature and, using the same name. The move ultimately benefitted Instagram, as many users abandoned Snapchat for Instagram’s version of the Stories feature.

In 2018, Facebook created an app called Lasso with many of the same functions as TikTok. But Lasso never gained much steam. Facebook is now dismantling the app to make way for Reels.

American Future?

The timing of the Reels launch is not insignificant. Just this month, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo warned that the White House might ban TikTok in the US over privacy concerns. The app, which is owned by the Beijing-based company ByteDance, collects data from its users, many of whom are minors. Fears have now mounted in the States that the Chinese government has easy access to these data. If a TikTok ban is on the horizon, Reels will be waiting in the wings.

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Uber Looks to Acquire Grubhub

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Ridesharing and food delivery giant Uber is reportedly in negotiations to purchase Grubhub, a rival food delivery service, in an all-stock deal. This acquisition comes amid coronavirus-related shutdowns that have all but halted Uber’s ridesharing service while aggressively bolstering demand for at-home food delivery.

Doubling Down

The move indicates Uber’s acknowledgment that it must pivot focus to food delivery for the time being. While its flagship ridesharing operation is perhaps its most identifiable service, by 2019, Uber Eats had already become a more profitable venture. Now, with restrictions against social gatherings, workplaces closed and fears about being in confined places abounding, Uber is looking to embrace and buttress its second most popular market segment.

“If you can’t beat ’em, eat ’em.”

Right now there are three main players in the food delivery industry. As of March, DoorDash handled 42% of sales, Grubhub followed 28% and Uber Eats was last with 20%.

Uber has a double incentive to swallow up Grubhub now, before DoorDash can make the move. By acquiring the second-largest player in the food delivery game, Uber not only knocks out an opponent, but Uber Eats becomes the market leader the day the deal closes.

Jesse Reyes, the CEO of J-Curve Advisors, says of Uber’s strategy, “If you can’t beat ’em, eat ’em.”

Antitrust Concerns

Uber’s scramble to eat up the competition is raising some alarms among monopoly watchdogs. Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI), the chair of the House Antitrust Subcommittee, calls Uber “a notoriously predatory company that has long denied its drivers a living wage.” He continued to say that Uber’s “attempt to acquire Grubhub—which has a history of exploiting local restaurants through deceptive tactics and extortionate fees—marks a new low in pandemic profiteering.”

While Uber’s move is certainly opportunistic, is it illegal? Antitrust laws exist to protect smaller businesses from being pushed out of the market by an unbeatable Goliath. Such laws also seek to prevent collusion between large firms to fix predatory prices that would bar other companies from entering the market and eviscerate fair competition. An acquisition by Uber is likely to be held under tight scrutiny, especially by the Democratically controlled House of Representatives.

Continued Haggling

No official acquisition has been confirmed just yet, but the two companies are in discussions on how to best combine forces. One GrubHub statement confirmed that the move is at least being considered, stating “consolidation could make sense in our industry.”

Meanwhile, rumors of haggling between the two companies suggest that Uber allegedly rejected an all-stock offer and that Grubhub demanded that investors receive 2.15 Uber shares for each share of Grubhub. Uber’s board of directors will convene in coming days to review the proposal.

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