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Will Telecommuting Play A Major Role In The Future Of Work?

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What would be the future of work post-COVID-19? Will working from home become the norm? Will organizations realize some jobs are non-essential while others are more important than they realized? Would this “business as unusual” become the new normal, especially for those whose assignments are not constrained to a particular location?

Experts have asked questions like these so many times about the future of work. “In this sudden new reality, we are witnessing a dramatic restructuring of the economic and social order,” said Euclides, a director of business development at Nakisa. “We have been disrupted and forced to start discussing what the next normal could entail and how different it will be from our current lives,” said another.

Let’s not be quick to forget that there was already a lot of discussion on how technology would affect the future of work long before the pandemic. The future has arrived, sooner than we expected – as companies and organizations shift to telecommuting to maintain social distancing. 

Will This Truly Become The Norm?

A recent Gartner survey shows that 74% of CFOs are planning to move previously on-site employees to remote work arrangements post COVID-19. On May 12, Jack Dorsey sent an email to twitter staff notifying them that they will be able to continue working from home as long as they see fit. 

Even in the sensitive parts of both public and private sectors, executives and business owners have realized that employees can contribute effectively despite being geographically dispersed. There is a notable increase in employee efficiencies, such as better organizations, and prioritization by the employees.

However, when telecommuting becomes the norm, executives/business owners need to be well-versed in measuring productivity.

Benefits And Drawbacks Of Telecommuting

The sudden work-from-home transformation is a boon for many businesses. Organizations are trying their best to operate while ensuring the health and safety of their employees working remotely. However, the line between private time and working time has become blurred for most people, causing an increase in stress and exposure to mental health risks. Virtual environments cannot replace the social value of office work, the dignity, and the sense of belonging we derive from it.

Regardless, telecommuting has its upsides, some of which are; the availability of work opportunities for rural dwellers, reduction in the cost of office rentals, renovations, and ongoing maintenance.

Therefore, most organizations should look into creating a flexible work environment, where employees can choose to work from home or not. Employers should design office spaces to encourage collaboration while accommodating different employee work styles and preferences. Perhaps this new and less-crowded environment would create a paradigm shift where ideas, interactions, and work relationships can thrive.

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Business

The Truth About Time Management: It’s Not About Time

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We’ve all heard the expression, “There aren’t enough hours in the day.” In truth, we’ve likely all said it at some point. Time management is a struggle for everybody, but especially entrepreneurs, CEOs, and founders.

Interestingly, some people seem to get more out of our 24 hours each day than others. As author Idowu Koyenikan said, the key to making the most of our hours isn’t time management—it’s life management. People who do it successfully balance the things they love with tasks they need to complete to maintain a well-rounded, satisfying life.

To-do lists or any one of the countless books on time management can help you achieve this balance, but things will eventually fall apart unless you make a habit of productivity—and stick to it. This might mean writing down your top priorities for the day or week, using a productivity app, or creating a plan that works best.

The Truth About Time Management for CEOs

When it comes to time management skills and techniques, business leaders are among the worst offenders. This typically happens because of the nature of leadership positions. These individuals are driven by the feeling that they have to do everything or have all the answers. On average, they’re also responsible for a lot: CEOs work 9.7 hours per weekday and spend 79 percent of weekend days and 70 percent of their vacation days working.

Success doesn’t come from adding countless tasks to your calendar and putting in the longest possible hours. It comes from purposeful, intentional work, which means managing your time more effectively to focus on what matters. To get there, business leaders have to reset their time-management expectations.

Only using productivity tools doesn’t lead to better time management—developing concrete time-management skills does.

How Are You Managing Your Time?

While CEOs and business leaders have countless resources at their disposal, they frequently lack time. Here are four steps to improve your time-management skills and techniques to maximize the time you do have: continue reading…

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Business

Why You Should Have A Website And Not Just Rely On Social Media

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No one could have predicted just how revolutionary social media would be when MySpace started gaining followers in the early 2000s. Even in 2006, when Facebook and Twitter became widely available to the global population, there were still lingering doubts about its longevity and potential as a profit-making vehicle.

In retrospect, it makes sense: after the meteoric rise and crushing fall of the 90s dot com bubble, it was still very much open to interpretation as to whether this new wave of interactive media would be able to survive (let alone thrive) into the future.

We know differently today.

As of early 2019, there were 4.2 billion internet users, of which 3.397 billion were active on social media.

To put this even further into perspective, consider that, on average, every one of those users owns 5.54 social media accounts and spends 116 minutes a day scrolling their news-feeds or chatting with friends.

And those mind-boggling numbers are still growing. Three hundred twenty million new profiles were created between September 2017 and October 2018, which works out to 10 new social media users every second. This figure alone is almost double the average number of human births per second.

That’s right. Social media growth is outstripping the global human birth rate.

You Do Not Own Social Media

We get it. Starting a Facebook page for your small business when you don’t have much working capital seems like a much smarter option than stumping up for a website. Not only is it free, it can also put you in touch with pretty much everybody you’d like to sell to. If you’re a local-oriented biz you can make a point of highlighting your location or some other specific selling point.  Continue reading…

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